Edible Gardens · Paws&Tails · plants

Frozen Avocado, Mangos, and Starfruit Trees.

Sad day in my backyard and in my heart.

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2018
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2017

I love this tree. It installed hope and inspiration. This Avocado plant is 10 years old and gracefully enhances our backyard.  Last year it finally started reproducing. This giant gave us thousands of fruits. Bags and bags were given away as gifts. The freezer was packed with frozen ziplock bags of avocado for smoothies. Landscapers helped themselves with fresh treats and marveled at its size

Moreover, this tree had its own genesis. It started as a seed and grew to its mighty height, instead of being manually grafted. It has two twin stalks supporting the crown. Birds, bees and the rest of pollinators enjoyed the social buzz-meet up during avocado’s flower season.

However, after September’ s Hurricane Irma, the climate has not been very favorable for Tampa Bay area vegetation. It seems that last winter was too harsh. 2018 is a wonderful new year, although it brought the freeze to our Florida area that has not been prevalent for more than a decade.

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Sigh. Poor tropical trees. Poor fruit trees. What a loss. One organically grown tree could have fed multiple families, wild animals, and house pets.

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Spring 2018

Turns out avocado is not toxic at all for dogs and they happily consumed the green fruit without the pit in it. Armadillos and squirrels didn’t touch the rest of vegetable harvest due to avocado abundance.

No more.

How do I get out of this funk morning the loss of the living matter?

Four more backyard trees suffered the brutal freezing temperatures. Producing mangos and star fruits are all still affected too. The brown color contrast in the green landscape accentuates our powerlessness in the midst of planetary weather unpredictability.  These trunk statues are the gloomy reminders of what could have been…..

What a loss.

This is kidney mango tree now and then.

 

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Bare Starfruit 2018 😦

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Simply too disappointing.

Lost for words.

Luda@PlantsandBeyond.com

All photographs belong to Luda @PlantsandBeyond.com

73 thoughts on “Frozen Avocado, Mangos, and Starfruit Trees.

  1. I feel your pain. We lost all of our Gardenia and Jasmine this year. It’s 70 today, but forecast for high 20s tomorrow night. We have over 26 JMs that have just leafed out, Tulips and ferns are popping. Not sure what the next 48 hours will bring. So sad.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. So sorry for the damage to your beautiful trees. I know it is a big disappointment for you and know how that feels. Mother Nature can often be cruel. But somehow, life always prevails. And even the smallest hint of a little green leaf is a great indication that things will come back. It just takes time and lots of patience.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Thank you for posting your photos. I felt your sorrow. Climate change is very real and I watch here as the flora and fauna attempt to adapt to survive. I hope a partial recovery for your trees is what you next see.

    Liked by 3 people

      1. I’m not sure if that’s good news for me or bad news. On the one hand, I can now freeze whatever’s left over. On the other hand, I don’t get to tell myself I’d better eat it so it doesn’t go to waste.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. My grandmother has a mango tree in her backyard which is over 40 years old. Every summer we also give away baskets and baskets of mangoes to friends and family.. I can understand how attached you are been to these lovely trees!

    Liked by 1 person

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