Edible Gardens · plants

Moss Definitely! The Unexpected Benefits Of Moss Gardening

While we all want to ensure a beautiful garden, or simply bring the therapeutic benefits of plant life into our lives via houseplants or window boxes, many of us are unaware that our green thumbs may need a bit of help.

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In the pursuit of raising healthy and beautiful plant life, many of us are unaware of the negative consequences of the products we use in the wider environment. The widespread use of synthetic fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides has helped farmers across the world to increase their yields and helped some beautiful verdant gardens to grow, but at a significant cost to the environment. While all gardeners can do their bit to help the planet by using more eco friendly gardening products, here, we’re going to look at a particular kind of gardening that is not only eco-friendly but staggeringly beautiful and easy to maintain.

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We’re going to look at moss gardening!

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With Earth Day not far behind us, perhaps we should all look at just what can be achieved by cultivating this frankly underrated substance. We’ve become conditioned to treat moss as an unwelcome guest at the party, a cantankerous weed (deliberate miscategorization) that gets in the way of more orthodox choices and ruins the integrity of our lawns. But there are many reasons why a moss garden is worthy of consideration…

It’s cheap and low maintenance!

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Wholesale moss is inexpensive and easy to come by. It requires no special fertilizers, pesticides or herbicides to cultivate. No need to supplement your soil with extra nitrogen to encourage its growth. No reason to trim it, mow it or shape it. You will not need to worry about it growing out of control while you go on vacation. While a moss garden is aesthetically pleasing, cheap and convenient for you, it’s the environmental benefits that make it a worthy addition to any garden.

It’s an antibiotic for your garden

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Not only does moss require no harmful chemical fertilizers, it can actually improve the overall health of your garden. For one thing, its presence encourages populations of beneficial insects, leazards and frogs (personally, I just love them), and its unpleasant taste deters common garden pests like deer. The biochemical compounds found in mosses even act as an antibiotic to deter fungal infections. So not only are moss gardeners helping to combat groundwater contamination by not using chemical products, they are actually repelling impurities.

It can help reduce air pollution

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Since moss doesn’t need to be mowed there’s no need to use gas driven lawn mowers which contaminate the air with noxious fumes. Remember that the emissions output of lawn mowers is barely regulated and that unlike the average automobile they do not have a catalytic converter.

Lastly, moss helps to conserve water

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While mosses certainly need to be hydrated to survive, they do not require the weekly deluge of water from a garden hose or sprinkler that grasses require staying healthy. A misting irrigation system is perfect for mosses and uses only a fraction of the water. Thus, moss gardening will help cut down your utility bills.

Hope you found this information interesting and intriguing.

Have a very green mossy (really healthy) day, my friends!

Luda@PlantsandBeyond🌿

Photographs listed here do not belong to Luda @PlantsandBeyond.com

©PlantsandBeyond.com  

35 thoughts on “Moss Definitely! The Unexpected Benefits Of Moss Gardening

  1. While we do have some moss on the property, living in a desert climate prevents it from being widespread. However, we do have a sprinkler system, so I may consider cultivating more. Thanks for the idea.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great photos! I had success some years back, when living in Michigan, with moving small sections of moss from one spot in the yard to another to help it spread. I was careful to make sure the earth below it was already damp. I’ve also used very small sections for indoor container gardens, adding acorns, dried leaves and small ferns. This lasted for a long time! When I did my original research on moss, I read that spritzing it with a mixture of milk and water can be helpful, but don’t remember why that was…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Becky, you are full of knowledge. So happy you contributed your experience here. I am so intrigued by the milk. Was not aware of such yummy addition and now will be on my way to researching further. Very grateful!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. This is right in front of us every day. So who would of thought of this besides you, Luda? So in-tune to nature! What great information. The pictures are incredible, too. I want to go to that mossy field by the waterfall and camp there for a few days!!! Really beautiful! Thank you for the interesting post and gorgeous pictures!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ah, what an interesting post and idea! I also enjoyed the photos. I never considered moss gardening, but now, this post is making me think twice. Good one, Luda! 👍

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Moss is my favorite…I have been trying to turn my entire backyard into moss, I have some and have been transplanting from other areas to help it spread. I would love my whole yard to be moss!!! I look forward to visiting the link you shared. Thanks for posting!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. your post is interesting and quite informative for me as i love nature gardens trees and what not. Thanks for visiting my site.
    kindly leave your valuable comments always. i would loo for your more posts

    Liked by 1 person

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